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2014 Midterm Elections

April 13, 2014 | CSPAN

Stefan Hankin and Kellyanne Conway talked about public opinion on politics and policy, and the political climate ahead of the 2014 midterm elections and 2016 presidential election. They also spoke about the future of the Affordable Care Act, income inequality, the gender pay equity gap, tax and fiscal policies, and President Obama’s foreign policy and political future. Watch here>>

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Poll shows tremendous support to delay Braves stadium vote

November 22, 2013 | Atlanta Business Chronicle

An overwhelming majority of Cobb County residents think county commissioners should delay Tuesday’s vote on the proposed $672 million Braves stadium so that public hearings can take place, according to a new poll by Washington, D.C.-based Lincoln Park Strategies. Read more>>

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Public Opinion on Policy

October 27, 2013 | C-SPAN

Stefan Hankin and Kellyanne Conway talked about public opinion on politics and policy following the government shutdown. Topics included voter attitudes both parties and President Obama are faring, and key issues such as health care, immigration, taxes, unemployment, the economy, and the role of government. More>>

U.S. Senate Leaders Announce Deal

October 16, 2013 | CTV News

Stefan Hankin discusses the deal to end the government shutdown on CTV News with Marcia Macmillan. More>>

Why Things Might be Even Worse in the Next Congress

October 15, 2013 | Stefan Hankin

With Congress appearing to be close to an agreement to end the shutdown and public polling clearly showing that the Republican brand has taken a huge hit, focus for many pundits has moved to how this will affect the 2014 elections. More>>

U.S. shutdown enters 3rd week: Is there a deal in the works?

October 15, 2013 | CTV News

Stefan Hankin and Jack Burkman discuss the government shutdown on CTV News. More>>

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How Democrats Lost the Colorado Recalls

September 23, 2013 | Stefan Hankin

Much ink has been spilled in the past week concerning the long-term implications of the successful recall of two Democratic State Senators in Colorado, which centered on gun control measures passed by the State Legislature and signed by Governor John Hickenlooper. Indeed, with an election focused on a hot-button issue and little else nationally to distract big donors, money poured into the race from both campaigns and outside groups. More>>

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Against the Dollar Coin

August 21, 2013 | The Atlantic Wire

In the halls of Congress, a measure is being pushed by four senators that could well ruin American lives. Called the COINS Act, it allegedly aims to save the government money by replacing dollar bills with dollar coins. More>>

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Blue Texas? Not So Fast

July 8, 2013 | Stefan Hankin

After Texas State Senator Wendy Davis’s recent 13-hour filibuster on anti-abortion legislation, many progressives may be looking at Texas with blue-colored glasses. In particular, the attention Senator Davis has received, along with the rapidly increasing Hispanic vote in the Lone Star state, has led many to speculate about the potential of a Democrat walking into the Governor’s mansion next year. More>>

Embracing a new playbook: How data-driven decisions can change the conversation in local races

March 13, 2013 | Stefan Hankin

In the post-analysis of the 2012 election there has been a lot of credit given to the Obama campaign for its use of capturing and mining data to help increase the turnout operation. Additionally, the new take on where and when to buy ads has been heralded as a new model for the future.

All of this credit is well deserved and should be discussed, looked at and adapted. However, what is getting less attention is how changes are happening in the campaign world on races where budget decisions are a lot tougher, personnel resources are less abundant and you actually have to work to get any earned media.  More>>

Obama’s Minimum-Wage Gambit Puts Republicans on Defensive

February 18, 2013 | The Daily Beast

The president’s surprise call for an increase to $9 an hour in the State of the Union has the GOP on the wrong end of popular opinion again. More>>

British Parliamentary System Comes to US

November 13, 2012 | Politix

We might have thought we were participating in one of America’s greatest democratic traditions by voting for an individual to be president on November 6. In reality, we further cemented our country’s transition to a defacto British parliamentary system that would make the Founding Fathers turn over in their graves. More>>

Success Through Targeting Campaigning

November 9, 2012 | Bangor Daily News

It’s likely that Maine Democrats — and other players in Maine’s 2012 legislative elections — learned a key lesson about campaign spending from the 2010 election cycle. They applied what they learned this year, when Democrats reversed the results of two years ago and took decisive control of both legislative chambers. More>>

The Nuclear Arms Race in Presidential Politics

November 4, 2012 | CTV News

Stefan Hankin and John Feehery discuss the nuclear arms race in presidential politics on CTV’s Question Period. More>>

 Poll: Overwhelming Majority of American Voters Support Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits Program

October 11, 2012 | PRNewswire

A new poll, conducted by Lincoln Park Strategies, finds the vast majority of likely voters support Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits and believe that Congress should target other areas of the government when proposing cuts to balance the federal budget. More>>

Candidates should listen to Coloradans’ views on energy policy

September 28, 2012 | Stefan Hankin

Nowhere is the myth of “extremism as the norm” more contradicted than in Colorado, a swing state hailed by many pundits as the key to the White House door. If candidates insist on seeing a sharply divided America, neither will do well here. To win, they must begin using real data and start speaking about policy issues in a way that respects the nuanced views of Coloradans. More>>

 Maryland gaming could hurt same-sex marriage

August 8, 2012 | ABC 7 News

As referendums on same-sex marriage and gaming are both on the ballot in Maryland in November, it’s possible that just having gaming on the ballot could help opponents defeat same sex marriage. More>>

Will the Wisconsin recall foreshadow November?

June 4, 2012 | Stefan Hankin

The recall election of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) has Democrats and Republicans in Washington keeping their fingers crossed for a team victory and a good week of talking points. Both parties have tried to package this election as a forecast of what’s to come in November. But is it really an accurate measure? Probably not, given recent history. More>>

Analysis: Not Courting Minorities May Doom GOP

May 10, 2012 | Reid Wilson

If recent electoral and population trends hold, Democrats need only wait a few presidential election cycles until they begin every White House contest as clear, eventually even overwhelming, favorites, says Reid Wilson from National Journal based on Lincoln Park Strategies’ recent projections memo. More>>

Lincoln Park Strategies’ Coverage of the GOP Nomination

The 2012 election cycle is in full gear, and as the GOP nomination contest takes shape, Lincoln Park Strategies’ Founder and President Stefan Hankin has been at the crux of the media analysis of the early primary and caucus results. Click here to read our analysis of the results from Iowa to New Hampshire to South Carolina and beyond. More>>

 

How Over-Regulation Could Risk the President’s Reelection

January 19, 2012 | Stefan Hankin

While we are months away from the 2012 elections, some things are already clear. First, the White House and Congress are in play for both parties. Second, barring any large national security event, the biggest issues in the upcoming election will be jobs and the economy. Third, it is increasingly evident that Mitt Romney will be the Republican nominee for president. More>>

Most Americans Against Replacing Dollar Bill With Coin, Poll Says

October 19, 2011| Harry Bradford

Given the choice, Americans still prefer crisp bills to shiny coins.

A lawmaker recently introduced legislation to abandon the paper dollar bill and replace it with a dollar coin, but it looks like most Americans are happy with their currency the way it is. More>>

A cloudy forecast for 2012

September 13, 2011 | Ruth Marcus

The word clouds tell the story — and illustrate the challenges ahead for both sides.

“TRYING,” says the cloud illustrating swing voters’ assessment of President Obama. And then, ominously: “liberal” and “ineffective.”

“STUBBORN,” says the cloud illustrating these voters’ view of congressional Republicans. Followed by “conservative,” “selfish,” “greedy” and — the one unabashedly positive phrase among the top 10 — “trying.” More>>

Poll: ‘Gaping divide’ between Democrats and ‘switchers’

September 13, 2011 | Aamer Madhani

President Obama is lagging behind Republicans in the chase for political moderate voters in 12 battleground states, according to a new poll by the centrist Democratic group Third Way. More>>

Labor unions: the latest moves to empower or weaken them

July 6, 2011 | Mark Trumbull

The Obama administration is showing support for labor unions, while some states, like Wisconsin, work to strip some of their key powers. If the job market continues to weaken, could Obama’s support for unions hinder his reelection campaign? More>>

Democrats Try to Crack Mystery of the Missing Voters

November 23, 2010 | Gerald F. Seib

A popular theory of this year’s midterm election holds that Democrats took a shellacking in part because big chunks of the party’s core liberal base, discouraged at the path of the Obama administration, stayed home rather than show up to vote as they did in 2008.

It’s an interesting narrative. It also doesn’t appear to be entirely accurate. More>>

Poll: Non-voters split over Barack Obama

November 17, 2010 | James Hohmann

As President Barack Obama charts a course to keep the White House in 2012, he’s getting conflicting signals from some of the people who helped him get there in the first place.

Voters who backed Obama in 2008 — but didn’t vote during the 2010 midterms — are divided over whether the president should have steered further to the center or governed more to the left, according to a poll being released Thursday by the moderate think tank Third Way.  More>>

Gutierrez mayoral poll: viable contender, torn about leaving Congress

October 12, 2010 | Lynn Sweet

A poll Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) commissioned to test the waters for a Chicago mayoral run shows he is very viable — and the favorite of Hispanic voters — but as of Monday night Gutierrez was torn over running or staying in Congress and leading the fight for immigration reform. More>>

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Default isn’t an option- for debt or Democrats

April 26, 2011 | Ryan McConaghy and Stefan Hankin

Last week, the sound of Wisconsin town hall attendees booing House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) was music to progressives’ ears.

The booing wasn’t undeserved – Chairman Ryan’s proposed budget would have disastrous consequences, and caters to the ideological purists on the right by ending Medicare as we know it and asking nothing from the wealthiest on taxes. However, progressives should pause before they consider opposition to the Ryan budget to be enough to carry the deficit debate. A quick look at some key insights from last year’s election shows that default isn’t an option – on U.S. debt or for Democratic political victory. More>>


 

 

Size Matters? How to pick your Pollster

August 23, 2010 | Stefan Hankin

A crucial first step for every political campaign is deciding on the consultants that will help guide their candidate to victory. More>>

Who really abandoned the Dems?

November 18, 2010 | Anne Kim and Stefan Hankin

Conventional wisdom is hardening on two fronts in the aftermath of the election—among Democrats about how to regain power and among Republicans about what to do with it.

Many Democrats argue, and now believe, that disenchanted liberal base voters were the ones who stayed home and that this election was a referendum on the economy. Many Republicans, on the other hand, now believe their own press about a definitive, albeit tea party-tinged, mandate.

Conventional wisdom, it turns out, is wrong. More>>

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